HYGROPHILA POLYSPERMA

Hardiness

Very Easy

Light Needs

Low

Plant Structure

Stem

Family

Acanthaceae

Genus

Hygrophila

Region

Asia

Location

India, Bhutan

Size

Individual stem width: 8-15cm (3-6in)

Growth Rate

Very fast

Can Be Grown Emersed

Yes

 

Habit

  • herbaceous perennial
  • amphibious, "obligate" (requiring a wet habitat)
  • in freshwaters, mostly submersed, partly emersed
  • growing from bottom to surface in water to 10 feet deep, or found creeping along edges
  • forming dense stands of stems in the water, later in the season breaking loose to form   

    large floating mats

  • rarely, terrestrial growth form grows in moist soil (McCann)
  • flowering in fall and winter
  • reproduces asexually (regrows from plant fragments) and perhaps sexually (from seed), 

    however Sutton (1996) says it's unknown whether seeds play a major part in its spread

  • stems fragment easily and are able to develop new plants from small fragments;  

     reportedly even a free-floating leaf can form a new plant

 

Habitat

  • in warmer climates; preferring flowing streams, but also may be found in slow-moving waters and in lakes
  • temperature tolerance: minimum temperature, 4o C (39o F); optimum temperature, 22-28o C (71-82o F); maximum temperature, 30o C (86o F) 
  • best light intensity for hygrophila growth is around 110 micro-einsteins/meter squared/hour 
  • (what is light intensity of site under trees in warm weather?)
  • low light compensation and saturation points and low CO2 compensation point make it a competitive plant because it can start growing in low light before other plants do 
  • tolerates a range of pH and water hardness conditions
  • dicot
  • rooted in the hydro-soil
  • stems creeping ascendant (rarely erect); to 6 feet and longer; upper most emersed 

    stems may be squarish; stems are brittle and easily break into fragments

  • leaves opposite (on the stem); simple; sparsely hairy; with pointed tips (acute)
  • leaf color variable, light green to brown to reddish
  • leaves submersed and emersed are more or less the same shape; mostly 1.5 in. 

    long, .5 in. wide, but can be larger

 

emersed leaves elliptic to obovate-elliptic; having no leaf stalks (sessile)

 submersed leaves larger and thinner than emersed leaves, broadly elliptic, broader toward tip; having short stalks

  • flowering in fall and winter (in Florida), October to early March (Sutton 1996)
  • flowers small, to 3/8 in. long, solitary, without stalks; found in leaf axils (angle where leaf meets the stem) in the apical (uppermost) parts of the emersed stems; corolla (petals) bluish-white to white, hairy, with two "lips", upper lip 2-lobed, lower lip 3-lobed; calyx (leaves covering the bottom part of the flower) hairy with 5 equal lobes
  • rooting at stem nodes; many roots
  • fruit a narrow capsule 6-7 mm long; 20-30 tiny flattened-round seeds 

Origin

  • there are about 100 species of Hygrophila in the world 
  • only three Hygrophila species occur in the U.S. -
  • Hygrophila polysperma is said to be native to the East Indies in India, its seeds are said 

     to be used as a medication

 

 

 HYGROPHILA POLYSPERMA