Overview

The Tracked Nerite Snail, also known as the Ruby Nerite Snail, is not as well known as other nerite snails such as the Zebra Nerite Snail and Olive Nerite Snail. Its coloration is a nice red-orange and is one of the larger nerite snail with a size ranging from 1/2" to a full inch in size. I compare this snail to the Zebra Nerite Snail for size and shape.

 

Breeding

One downside to the Tracked Nerite Snail, and this applies to most other nerite snails, is its inability to breed in pure freshwater. The Tracked Nerite Snail requires brackish water in order to breed successfully. Some hobbyists have been somewhat successful in breeding nerite snails but it does not seem that the young snails survive for too long. Some may look at this as a plus, meaning that the Tracked Nerite will not over populate a tank and become another pest in the aquarium.

 

Appearance

The Tracked Nerite Snail is a red-orange color, slightly more on the orange side. It has small black stripes, or dashes, that reticulate along with the growth of the snails shell. The small dashes look similar to tire tracks, hence the name Tracked Nerite Snail. As the snail grows and the shell becomes wider so do the dashes. The black dashes offset the red-orange coloration nicely.

 

Feeding

Another plus for the Tracked Nerite Snail is its algae eating abilities. This snail will clean your tank glass spotless and also clean algae off of rocks and even leaves. It is recommended that you supplement their diet with algae wafers or similar type food since the Tracked Nerite Snail may not be able to sustain itself solely on algae in the tank. This species is also larger than other nerite snails and will not be able to successfully eat algae off of small leaves due to its weight.

 

Behavior

The Tracked Nerite Snail can tend to escape from a tank and make its way outside of the tank. It is considered a tidal snail and can live outside of water. Simply pick them up and put them back inside of the tank, they will survive as long as they have not been out of the tank for too long. It is recommend to keep an eye on them and look around the tank occasionally for possible escapes. It is thought that when the snail is uncomfortable it will escape, but will not when happy. The Tracked Nerite Snail is also an extremely docile creature and does not bother any other aquarium inhabitants.